2nd International Conference on
Food Science and Bioprocess Technology

October 1-3, 2018 at Frankfurt, Germany

Program Schedule

  • Keynote Speaker

    Time:

    Title

    Title: Current Status and Challenges in Food Science & Technology: Lessons for Future

    M Shivamurthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India
    Biography
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    Biography

    M Shivamurthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Dr. M. Shivamurthy is currently the Professor (HAG) and University Head of the Department of Agricultural Extension, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore, India. Visiting scholar for the Ghent University, Belgium and Humboldt-University, Berlin besides local coordinator for the International Masters in Rural Development. He carried out more than 15 externally funded research projects and research guide for 21 MSc and PhD scholars, has over 200 publications in reputed journals /proceedings and books. In recognition of his work he has received several national and international awards and presented papers at more than thirty international conferences and training programmes. Specialization and present research: Rural Development, Natural Resource Management, Adoption and Diffusion Studies, Human Resource Management, Empowerment of women, formation of SHGs and Scaling up of Agricultural Innovations in rural areas.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    M Shivamurthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Sustainably feeding the constantly growing world is one of our major challenges. The demand for food was achieved by a blend of scientific and technological progress, government policies, institutional interventions, business investments and through delivery mechanisms. However, increased farm inputs and outputs were partly at the expense of detrimental effects on the environment. It is estimated that, in 2050 there will be 9.8billion people requiring about 70 percent more food for consumption. In this regard, food science and technology has a significant role to play in achieving food and nutrition security of the world. Advancement in food preservation and stabilisation technologies can extend shelf life of food and food products by strengthening the ability of food sustainably available for all by reducing food waste. Good post-harvest handling practices from farm to retail, including supporting logistics and infrastructure, can mitigate the loss of fresh produce. This is becoming increasingly relevant as the food produced in rural areas has to reach the growing population in urban areas and megacities. This results in increased pressure for the optimisation of the distribution of food, improved access to appropriate modes of transportation and better management of cool chain logistics to ensure sustainable food supply. Despite these concerns for the future, the continuous push for research and technological advancements must continue for successful achievement of global food security and sustainability issues.Existing and emerging technologies has to address the four dimensions of food security. For example, technologies for improving agricultural productivity, methods for improving soil fertility and irrigation technologies can increase food availability. Post-harvest and processing technologies can address food accessibility, biofortification can make food more nutritious and climate-smart technologies (including the use of precision agriculture and early warning systems) can mitigate food instability. However, harnessing the potential of such technologies for food security requires investments in research and development, human capital, infrastructure and knowledge flows. A favourable environment for agricultural innovation would benefit from an enabling environment, gender-sensitive approaches to technology development and dissemination, and regional &international collaboration. Furthermore, technology foresight and assessment for agricultural innovations must be in place to manage potential technological risks, while maximizing potential improvements to food security. Preceding international initiatives were rightly concerned with hunger and malnutrition, while many of these initiatives exhibited concern for the poor, but not all were able to translate the concern for improving nutritional well-being into action. Accordingly, identification of successful ways and means for achieving progress is especially important. Planners and policy makers need an effective policy and programme framework for making decisions and for formulating workable and effective interventions. These not only need to be adapted easily at different country situations, also they need to be sensitive and responsive to the socio-cultural contexts and complexities. Additionally, effective interventions require nutritional surveillance and provision of security is specially needed during emergencies and economic crises.

    Keynote Speaker

    Time:

    Title

    Title: Heavy Metal Toxicity and Accumulation in Plants: A Case Study on Cadmium Tolerance in Barle

    Feibo Wu
    Zhejiang University, China
    Biography
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    Biography

    Feibo Wu
    Zhejiang University, China

    Dr., Prof. Feibo Wu has completed her PhD in 2003 from Zhejiang University (ZJU). She is the Deputy Director of Crop Science Institute of ZJU. Her main research interest is evaluation and identification of plant germplasm, mainly in barley, resistant/tolerant to abiotic stresses and its molecular physiology, and phytoremediation of metal-contaminated environments and safe crop production. She has published 97 papers in reputed SCI-JOURNALS and has been serving as an editorial board member of Plant Growth Regulation



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Feibo Wu
    Zhejiang University, China

    Cadmium is a non-essential, toxic heavy metal for plants, animals and humans.Genotypes with low grain Cd accumulation and Cd tolerant were successfully screenedfrom 600 barley genotypes. Physiological mechanism for genotypic differences in Cd accumulation and tolerance in barley was elucidatevia characterizing physiochemical characters, includingcd uptake and subcellular distribution, photosynthesis, free amino acid, phytochelatin, an atomic structure, atpase, reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism and other physio-chemical responses.Furthermore, stress-specific proteins and relevant genes associated with Cd tolerance were identified. qtls were detected for root Cd concentration and Cd tolerance index (CTI) of shoot dry weight, root glutathione peroxidase and dehydro as corbatereductase. Meanwhile, zipgenes (ZIP3, ZIP8) were isolated from low and high grain Cd accumulation barley genotypes, respectively, and incorporated into barley plants (Golden Promise) using a grobacterium transformation. In addition, we investigated the effects of Zn, GSH, NO and ASA on alleviating Cd stress, indicating that rational Zn, GSH, NO, or/and Se application could alleviate Cd toxicity to plants and reduce Cd uptake and accumulation

    Sessions:
    Food Engineering & Agri-Food Technology and Dairy Technology & Food Biotechnology & Food and Chemical Toxicology & Food Safety: The Rising Crisis and Its Management & Food Preservation and Packaging

    Time:

    Title: Value Addition of Finger Millet enhances Nutritional Security: Success of Women Agripreneur

    K Nishitha
    Karnataka Agriculture Price Commission, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    K Nishitha
    Karnataka Agriculture Price Commission, India

    K Nishitha, Research Associate at Karnataka Agriculture Price Commission, Bengaluru, India. K Nishitha has completed Master degree in Agricultural Extension at University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru and have worked as Senior Research Fellow at Agriculture Technology Information Centre, Bengaluru. K Nishitha was a Erasmus Mundus Namaste-India Master Exchange student at Georg-August University of Goettingen, Germany and have participated in the European Summer Course – 2016, “What’s up, Europe?” funded by DAAD, held at the European Academy of Otzenhausen, Germany. Published three research papers in NAAS rated journals and have presented several research articles in the National and International Conference. She has received ‘Best Poster Presentation Award’ in the International Conference held during 2013 at Bengaluru.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    K Nishitha
    Karnataka Agriculture Price Commission, India

    Millets are gaining more recognition in the recent years as a substitute for major cereal grains to fill the gap between food security and increasing population. They are superior in respect to protein, energy, vitamins, minerals and are rich source of dietary fibre and phyto-chemicals. Minor millets act as a shield against nutritional deficiency disorders and provide nutritional security. Double income families are increasing these years and people want to relish food in various delicacies, hence the value added products of millets are very popular meeting the needs of modernized population. Finger millet (Eleusine coracana) is one of the important minor millet cultivated in Southern Karnataka as a staple crop. It is a crop with high nutraceutical value that can serve as an ideal food to address the health issues of people suffering from high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity. The present article highlights about the success story of a women agripreneur. Mrs. Latha B.G. is a successful agripreneur specialized in processed multi-grains and finger millet products. She has initiated a company called “Shree Agro Foods” with a brand name “Navavita” after undergoing training programme on Entrepreneurship Development at AWAKE(Association for Women Entrepreneurs of Karnataka). She has also undergone training on processing, marketing and value addition of millets at Bakery Training Unit, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru. Shree Agro Foods is preparing value added multi grain products (Navadhanya health mix and sprouted nava dhanya malt) and finger millet products (Malt, dosa mix, huri-hittu, flour, chocolates, laddu, mixture and papad). Packing material is designed by Shree Agro-Foods and products are licensed by Food Safety and Standards Authority of India and District Industries Centre. Products are marketed at food exhibitions, also through retail stores and online marketing. She earns an annual net income of three lakh rupees ($ 4500) and she has engaged fellow women to assist in the production of value added products. Looking into her achievements she has been recognized with ‘Entrepreneur Excellency Award’ by AWAKE. Once a common women and now an entrepreneur is all enthralled and is a motivation to other women folk across the globe.

    Time:

    Title: Development of Value Added Products from Betel Leaves (Piper Betel L)

    Vijayalaxmi K G
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    Vijayalaxmi K G
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Vijayalaxmi K G has completed her Ph.D in 2009 in University of Mysore in the Food Science & Nutrition. Presently she is working as a professor UAS Bangalore, India. Vijayalaxmi had 6 research projects as Principal Investigator. She published 30 research papers in National/ International Journals,Published 55 popular articles, 15 leaflets and 30 training manuals and also she guided one PhD and 8 M. Sc students



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Vijayalaxmi K G
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    The deep green heart shaped betel leaves popularly called as paan in India, belongs to Piperaceae family and known for its nutritional and medicinal value. The present study was undertaken to standardize the process of dehydration and to develop shelf stable products. Two types of betel leaves namely, Kariyele and Ambadiyele were analyzed for physical, physico-chemical and nutrient analysis. The dehydration and rehydration ratio for Kariyele and Ambadiyele were (18.41 and 5.16) and (13.41 and 4.87) respectively. Value added products from betel leaves were developed such as khakhra, papad and soup mix by incorporating betel leaves powder at 5%, 7.5% and 10% levels. Sensory evaluation revealed that, developed products were in the range of like moderately to like extremely. Betel leaves khakhra (BKK1 and BAK1), papad (BKP1 and BAP1) and soup mix (BKSM1 and BASM1) were best accepted (at 5%) compared to other variations. Khakhra had higher energy (441.78 to 444.7 Kcal), fat (12.15g to 12.29g), fiber (2.75g to 2.97g) and iron (5.51mg to 7.30mg). Papad had higher protein (23.78g to 24.41g) and calcium (111mg to 252mg) where as β- carotene (294.11μg to 624.21μg) and vitamin- C (2.34mg to 4.07mg) were higher in soup mix. The developed products were within safe permissible limits and accepted up to 60 days at room temperature when stored in aluminium pouches. The cost of products were found to be higher for papad (Rs 26/-) and least for khakhra (Rs 17/-). Thus, betel leaves could be dehydrated and processed into value added shelf stable products.

    Time:

    Title: Diversification of Agriculture for Achieving Food and Nutritional Security: Lessons from South India

    M Shivamurthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    M Shivamurthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Dr M Shivamurthy is currently the Professor (HAG) and University Head of the Department of Agricultural Extension, University of Agricultural Sciences,Bangalore, India. Visiting scholar for the Ghent University, Belgium and Humboldt-University, Berlin besides local coordinator for the International Masters in Rural Development. He carried out more than 15 externally funded research projects and research guide for 21 MSc and PhD scholars, has over 200 publications in reputed journals /proceedings and books. In recognition of his work he has received several national and international awards and presented papers at more than thirty international conferences and training programmes. Specialization and present research: Rural Development, Natural Resource Management, Adoption and Diffusion Studies, Human Resource Management, Empowerment of women, formation of SHGs and Scaling up of Agricultural Innovations in rural areas.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    M Shivamurthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Agriculture development ensures the food, energy and nutritional security of any country besides, it is crucial for human health and well-being. Rural household diets in India indicated that, agricultural growth has contributed to growing calorie intake with marginal effect on the intake of protein and micronutrients. This inturn causes less impact of agriculture on household dietary diversity and nutrient adequacy. Predominance of high level of under-nutrition and a huge population depending on agriculture, the present global thinking on leveraging agriculture for nutrition security has stimulated the agricultural sector to realign its efforts not only to enhance food production but also to address malnutrition. In this regard crop diversification is a need of the hour not only for food and nutritional security but also for sustainable development. Agricultural diversification refers to the shift from the regional dominance of one crop towards the production of a large number of crops to meet the increasing demand of different kinds of food.The crop diversification has emerged as an important alternative to attain the objectives of output growth,employment generation and natural resources sustainability in India. The diversification of agriculture not only help to food and nutritional security but also natural resource management for sustainable agricultural development. Diversity in agriculture has greater impact on the agricultural indicators like; production and productivity efficiency, land use efficiency, energy use, water use, nutrient use, profitability, economic efficiency, employment generation and soil fertility management. Reorienting food systems towards improving nutrition is vital for achieving global goal of ending all forms of malnutrition. The study concludes that, through diversity of food and diets with nutrition-sensitive farming methods it is possible to achieve household nutrition security and health status.

    Time:

    Title: Improving the Tuber Yield of Potato through use of Growth Retardant

    M Mahadeva Murthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    M Mahadeva Murthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Dr M Mahadeva is presently working as Professor in University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru. And nominated as member for Karnataka Bio diversity Board, Karnataka Rajya Vignana Parishath, Environmental Protection Institute and Joint Secretary for Institute of Agroforestry farmers and Technologies.Guided eight M.Sc students out of which two students secured gold medal and guided one PhD student. Presently guiding four M.Sc and three Ph.D students.Awarded as Best faculty in 6th Academic Brilliance Award, 2018 from Research wing for excellence in Professional Education & Industry.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    M Mahadeva Murthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    With the decline in land area and other resources for agriculture, there is a greater challenge to produce more food to meet evergrowing population. In this regard, different approaches are required to produce more food per unit land area. In the past, several growth hormones and growth retardants have been used successfully to improve the productivity of crops. With this background, in the present study, mepiquate chloride, a growth retardant was used to test the effect of potato growth and yield. Mepiquate chloride is an inhibitor of GA and therefore, upon application. The GA effect is reduced. Potato being a tuber crop needs improvement in tuber production rather than vegetation growth. This however is possible if vegetative growth is controlled mainly by use of growth retardants. Mepiquate chloride being a growth retardant it is expected to reduce the vegetative growth and at the same time improves the tuber yield. Accordingly, in the present study, when chemical is sprayed on potato plants twice at 45th and 60th day,enhanced the tuber yield significantly. At all the stages of mepiquate chloride sprayed, at 300ppm resulted in higher yield when compared to other treatments. The tuber yield per plot showed an increase from 29.4 to 47.5%. Further, the vegetative growth in mepiquate chloride sprayed plants reduced significantly over unsprayed control plants. The results therefore indicate that, mepiquate chloride can be used to improve the tuber yield and therefore increase the food security of the modern world.

    Time:

    Title: Pasting, Morphological and Functional Properties of Breadfruit (Artocarpus Altilis) Starch Cross-linked with Ethylene Glycol Dimethacrylate

    Kehinde N Awokoya
    Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria

    Biography
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    Biography

    Kehinde N Awokoya
    Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria

    Kehinde N Awokoya was present working as a Lecturer in Polymer and Supramolecular Chemistry at the department of chemistry in Awolowo university at Nigeria.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Kehinde N Awokoya
    Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria

    A novel succinylated cross linked starch was prepared by using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as a cross linker. In this current research, the study was designed to investigate the influence of single and dual chemical modifications on functional,pasting and morphological properties of starch extracted from breadfruit. The extracted starch was chemically modified to produce succinylated (SST) and succinylated-crosslinked starches (SCT). Proximate analysis revealed that following modifications, SST starches retained higher moisture content compared to native starch, while SCT starch had lower moisture content. Crude protein,crude fibre, crude fat and total ash of the native starch reduced following succinylation but increased after crosslinking. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that crosslinked granules were not uniformly distributed but formed some aggregates. The absorption bands of the carbonyl group at 1784 and 1716 cm-1 appeared in FTIR spectra. The result indicates that all forms of modification reduced the water binding capacity of native breadfruit starch. Gelation studies revealed that cross linked breadfruit starch had a superior gelating property than the succinylated and native starches. The values of 94.70 and 79.95 OC obtained for the pasting temperature of SST and SCT respectively were higher than corresponding value of 79.90 OC listed for native starch. All forms of modification reduced peak viscosity, trough viscosity, breakdown viscosity and final viscosity of the native starch. Setback viscosity reduced after succinylation but increased in cross linked derivative, indicating less syneresis is likely to take place within the starch helices.

    Time:

    Title: Agricultural Residues for Future Energy Option in Sudan: An Analysis

    Abdeen Omer
    Energy Research Institute, United Kingdom

    Biography
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    Biography

    Abdeen Omer
    Energy Research Institute, United Kingdom

    Dr Abdeen Omer (BSc, MSc, PhD) is an Associate Researcher at Energy Research Institute (ERI). He obtained both his PhD degree in the Built Environment and Master of Philosophy degree in Renewable Energy Technologies from the University of Nottingham. He is qualified Mechanical Engineer with a proven track record within the water industry and renewable energy technologies. He has been graduated from University of El Menoufia, Egypt, B.Sc in Mechanical Engineering. His previous experience involved being a member of the research team at the National Council for Research/Energy Research Institute in Sudan and working director of research and development for National Water Equipment Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Sudan. He has been listed in the book WHO’S WHO in the World 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. He has published over 300 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 200 review articles, 15 books and 150 chapters in books.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Abdeen Omer
    Energy Research Institute, United Kingdom

    Like many tropical countries, Sudan has ample biomass resources that can be efficiently exploited in a manner that is both profitable and sustainable. Fuel-wood farming offers cost-effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions for Sudan, with the added benefit of providing sustainable livelihoods in rural areas. This article provides an overview of biomass energy activities and highlights future plans concerning optimum technical and economical utilization of biomass energy available in Sudan. Results suggest that biomass energy technologies must be encouraged, promoted, implemented, and fully demonstrated in Sudan.

    Time:

    Title: Development of Innovative Food Products for Food Nutrient Security and Development of Food Industries in Kenya

    Mary K Walingo
    Maasai Mara University, Kenya

    Biography
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    Biography

    Mary K Walingo
    Maasai Mara University, Kenya

    Mary K Walingo is the Vice-Chancellor of Maasai Mara University in Kenya. And Walingo research interests are mostly related to the Food security, Community Development, Culture, Human Rights, Freedom, Nutrition.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Mary K Walingo
    Maasai Mara University, Kenya

    Food product development is important in the development and growth of food industries and stabilizing household food security in Kenya. There are many opportunities for enterprise growth and food security in households in seasons when there is abundant perishable fruits and vegetables. Development of innovative products, in such seasons offer a wide range of available food-nutrientrich products, that satisfy the organoleptic requirements of the consumers. Information concerning consumer’s organoleptic properties needs, and expectations inform the development of acceptable innovative products. Assessment of the organoleptic properties of food products is important for building competitive advantage and long-term enterprise success in the market, for food and nutrient security in households, and in the prevention of negative changes in product quality and acceptability. Some innovative products developed to improve the iron, zinc and copper content of populations are discussed in this paper.

  • Keynote Speaker

    Time:

    Title

    Title: Membrane Separation Processes and their Application in Food, Beverage and Herbal Industries

    Samuel P Kusumocahyo
    Swiss German University, Indonesia
    Biography
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    Biography

    Samuel P Kusumocahyo
    Swiss German University, Indonesia

    Samuel P Kusumocahyo is a lecturer and researcher in the Faculty of Life Sciences and Technology, Swiss German University, Indonesia. His current position is the Dean of the faculty covering study programs of Food Technology, Sustainable Energy & Environment, Pharmaceutical Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering. He received Bachelor & Master Degree (Dipl.-Ing) in Chemical Engineering from Aachen University (RWTH Aachen), Germany, and Doctoral Degree in Chemical Engineering & Environmental Science from Shizuoka University, Japan. He is an expert in the separation processes using membranes which are widely applied for food & beverage industries, waste treatment, water purification, chemical processes, biofuels production, etc. His recent research activities include the optimization of extraction processes of various Indonesian natural plants for the development of new source of bioactive compounds.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Samuel P Kusumocahyo
    Swiss German University, Indonesia

    Membrane technology has gained more application for the separation and purification processes in various industries, including food, beverage and herbal industries. There are two categories of membrane based on the material used to prepare it, namely polymer membranes and ceramic membranes, each of them having advantageous and disadvantageous. Polymer membranes are cheaper in price compared to the ceramic membranes, however ceramic membranes show a better stability against chemicals and can be applied at a higher temperature. Here, the development of various membranes both polymer and ceramic, and their application for food, beverage and herbal industries are presented. An ultrafiltration polymer membrane was developed using beverage plastic bottles as the source of the membrane polymer material. The membrane was tested for an ultrafiltration experiment and showed a rejection of particles with a molecular weight about 20,000 Dalton. The utilization of plastic bottle waste as the raw material to prepare the membrane also becomes a solution for the environmental problem caused by the large amount of disposed plastic bottle waste. Further, the development of a ceramic microfiltration membrane from kaolin and alumina is also presented. The result of the microfiltration experiment showed that the ceramic membrane had a high permeate flux and a 100% rejection of microorganism, showing that the membrane has a potential to applied for purification and sterilization processes in food, beverage and herbal industries. Some examples of the application of the membranes for the sterilization of extract solutions such as butterfly pea extract and coffee silver skin extract solutions are presented. Keyword: membrane, microfiltration, ultrafiltration, food, beverage, herbal, sterilization

    Sessions:
    Food and Nutrition, Metabolism and Clinical Nutrition & Food Additives, Innovations and Its Impact & Food Regulatory Measures and Guidelines

    Time:

    Title: The Shelf Life Stability of Mixed Fruit and Vegetable Juice Fortified with Moringa Oleifera Leaves Juice

    Jamila M Hashemi
    King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Jamila M Hashemi
    King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

    Jamila M Hashemi working as associate professor in the King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. She have published articles mostly related food research.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Jamila M Hashemi
    King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

    Background: Moringa Olifera leaves (M.O.L) has nutritional and medical properties, it is consumed in some countries such as Egypt, Niger, Philippines etc. which, make these leaves suitable for use in making many products such as juices. Fruits and vegetables are “juicy foods” that contain mostly water; they are commonly consumed as a juice, beverage, as a flavoring agent or as an ingredient in foods. In order to have higher quality and fresher juices, the standard is often freshly squeezed and unprocessed juice, but their shelf life is less than 6 or 7 days depending on the fruit or vegetable types at 4±1°C. Consequently, they are preserved by various techniques such as Thermal pasteurization and heat treatment. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the processed fruit and vegetable juices mixed with fresh M.O.L juice to produce untraditional healthy products as well as prolonging the shelf life with minimal loss of bioactive compounds. Methods: This study treated fruit and vegetable juices with boiling each fruit and vegetable in an amount of water, blended, filtrated and then mixed as follows: A- M.O. 50% + Pineapple 38% + Carrot 10 % + Ginger 2% (Treatment A). B- M.O. 60% + Pineapple 28% + Carrot 10 % + Ginger 2% (Treatment B). C- M.O. 40% + Pineapple 38% + Carrot 20 % + Ginger 2% (Treatment C). Sensorial, physicochemical and microbiological analysis was conducted on juices packed in glass bottles during storing at 4±1°C. Results of sensory evaluation indicated that treatment A and B were almost palatable products among different panelists. Physicochemical analysis showed that treatment C had the highest contents of total soluble solids (T.S.S), pH value, ascorbic acid, total phenolic contents and antioxidant activity at zero time and after one month of storage compared to other treatments. Meanwhile,treatment A and B were having a good amount of ascorbic acid reached to (4.15 and 5.01 mg/100ml), total phenolic (53.46 and 59.32 mgGAE/ml) and antioxidant activity (68.52 and 70.81%) after one month of storage. These parameters were affected by storage time, ascorbic acid, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity were decreased during storage time of all treatments. Results of chemical analysis ascertained that raw F.M.O.L is an excellent source of ascorbic acid (139.46 mg/100g), for now, F.M.O.L juice is an excellent source of phenolic compounds (38.76 mg GAE/mg) and antioxidant activity (77.65%), respectively too. In addition, the color analysis of (L*, a* and b*) values appeared that all treatments were lightness, tend to redness more than yellowness at zero time and increased after one month of storage. It appeared that using HPLC before and after hydrolysis method is the suitable process for the extraction of phenolic compounds from these types of juices. Decisively, results indicated that Epicatechin (EP), rutin (RU), chlorogenic acid (CH), 4-O-Caffeoylquinic acid (CA) and quercetin (QU) were predominant phenolic compounds in pineapple, carrot and ginger mixed with F.M.O.L juice. Whereas, the others are dominant phenolic constituents. Microbiological analysis (bacterial, yeasts and molds) indicated there is a growth of yeasts after one month of storage in treatment A and C except treatment B. The process of heat treatment (boiling at 100˚C) with mixed juices with F.M.O.L juice by 50% (treatment B) preserve the juice up to one month of storage compared to other treatments. This indicated that F.M.O.L juice can be used in food applications. Conclusion: It is concluded that through the aforementioned obtained results of sensory evaluation and other analysis that it was successful and applicable to produce processed fruit and vegetable juices mixed with 40% and 50% of F.M.O.L juice the suitable ratios for using F.M.O.L juice in such juices.

    Time:

    Title: Urbanization Influence on Consumption Pattern and Nutritional Status across the Rural and Urban Gradient

    Vijayalakshmi D
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    Vijayalakshmi D
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    D Vijayalakshmi currently working as professor in the department food science and technology in the university of Agricultural sciences, India



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Vijayalakshmi D
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Nutrition transition is the shift in dietary consumption and energy expenditure that coincides with socio-economic, demographic and epidemiological changing pattern. Bengaluru is the capital city of Karnataka state, India which is often referred to as “Silicon City” and has its growing urbanization influence on surrounding rural localities. Research team funded with DBT conducted study to evaluate urbanization effects on north and south transects across rural urban interface of Bengaluru among middle income families. From north and south regions of Bengaluru, 300 households comprising of rural (100), transition (100) and urban area (100). The parameters like socio-economic status, food habits, nutrient deficiencies, prevalence of degenerative diseases and nutritional status were studied. Most of the respondents belonged to middle age group (58%), nuclear family (60%) and small family size (50%). Across the rural- urban gradient significant changes were observed in family type (χ2 =7.86*), family size (χ2= 16.19*)and education (χ2 =21.78*). Agriculture was predominant occupation in rural (82%) as against urban with non-agriculture (88%).Most of the respondents (65%) had three meals a day and were non- vegetarians (80%). Nutrient deficiency symptoms observed were found statistically non significant between regions. Dispigmentation of hair was observed more in rural compared to other regions (χ2=8.82*). Prevalence of overweight (24.5%) and obesity (7.1%) was significantly more (χ2=26.73*) in urban compared to transition and rural. Hypertension and diabetes were most common degenerative diseases observed in study area. Dietary diversity scores did not differ across the gradient. With all these considered parameters study highlights on impact of urbanization on surrounding localities of Bengaluru and also compare the stretch of impacts between north and south regions.

    Time:

    Title: Nutritional Crisis Management among Beneficiaries and Non-Beneficiaries of Integrated Farming System Demonstration (IFSD)

    B Krishnamurthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    B Krishnamurthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Dr B Krishnamurthy, Professor of Agricultural Extension, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru, India. Krishnamurthy was specialised in Human Resource Development, Gender Issues, and Capacity Building. B Krishnamurthy served as Co-Principal Investigator for research projects funded by Government of India and Government of Karnataka. He have presented a research paper on Farmers Field School at PGIA, Sri Lanka (1999) and IRRI Philippines (2000) and published 20 research papers. Guided 4 Ph.D scholars and 12 Masters Graduates. He have served as a guest faculty in IMRD faculty exchange program meat Ghent University, Gent, Belgium and University of Humboldt, Berlin, Germany (2013) under Erasmus Mundus Programme.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    B Krishnamurthy
    University of Agricultural Sciences, India

    Agriculture has been the major source of livelihood in India. Agriculture system today can be described as goal oriented manipulations of ecosystems for human gains. Yield and profit maximization approach has led to serious environmental,ecological, economic and social problems. Sustaining household food and nutritional security has been an issue of prime importance to majority of the farmers. The Integrated Farming System (IFS) approach is the way to conserve natural resources and to save the farming community from the vicious cycle of malnutrition and poverty. It is an appropriate combination of farm enterprises viz., cropping system, livestock, fishery, forestry, poultry and the other means for sustainable crop productivity and livestock production resulting in economically profitable return. Two hundred IFSD beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries from Mandya district of Karnataka state were personally interviewed to know their nutritional status. The results revealed that most of the beneficiaries (41.25%) had high nutritional security followed by 38.75 and 20.00 percent had medium and low nutritional security, respectively. Whereas, more than half of the non beneficiaries had low (60%) nutritional security followed by 30 and 10 percent of them had medium and high nutritional security, respectively. It can be inferred that a larger proportion of IFSD beneficiaries had higher level of nutritional security as they were made aware of IFS technologies through demonstrations, field visits regarding kitchen gardening and dairy and also vegetable seedlings were provided to them, thereby consumption of nutritious vegetables and milk enhanced nutrients in their food. On the contrary, majority of the non-beneficiaries had lower level of nutritional security; hence non-beneficiaries have to be motivated to adopt IFS activities to achieve better nutritional status. Nutritional security is achieved when an adequate quantity, quality, hygienic and socio-culturally acceptable food is available and satisfactorily utilized by all people to lead a healthy lifestyle.

    Time:

    Title: Utilization of Waste from Coffee Industry for the Development of Antioxidant Rich Products

    Samuel P Kusumocahyo
    Swiss German University, Indonesia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Samuel P Kusumocahyo
    Swiss German University, Indonesia

    Samuel P Kusumocahyo is a lecturer and researcher in the Faculty of Life Sciences and Technology, Swiss German University, Indonesia. His current position is the Dean of the faculty covering study programs of Food Technology, Sustainable Energy & Environment, Pharmaceutical Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering. He received Bachelor & Master Degree (Dipl.-Ing) in Chemical Engineering from Aachen University (RWTH Aachen), Germany, and Doctoral Degree in Chemical Engineering & Environmental Science from Shizuoka University, Japan. He is an expert in the separation processes using membranes which are widely applied for food & beverage industries, waste treatment, water purification, chemical processes, biofuels production, etc. His recent research activities include the optimization of extraction processes of various Indonesian natural plants for the development of new source of bioactive compounds



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Samuel P Kusumocahyo
    Swiss German University, Indonesia

    This study aimed to transform coffee silverskin, the main waste product of coffee roasting industry that has a substantial amount of antioxidant, into antioxidant rich beverage products. The study started by observing the basic of the ground coffee silverskin, followed by various extraction ratio trials to find the suitable ratio. The resulting extract was analyzed and showed an adequate level of phenolic and antioxidant, yet bitter in taste. The formulation was started by determining the ingredients and their constrains needed to improve the overall taste and antioxidant stability, followed by a screening stage to found the correlation between the factors and responses. The optimization was done by the help of Design Expert Software, which generated two optimum formulas that matched the target and later decided based on affective test. The final formula consisted of 4.36% silverskin, 5.83% sugar, 0.22% chocolate flavor and 1.00% cyclodextrin (w/v). The analysis result showed that the newly developed coffee silverskin drink had 1219.08 mg/L of phenolic and 54.00% of DPPH• inhibition with a better stability compared to the pure extract. Based on the sensory analysis, the overall taste of the new drink had also gone through a significant improvement that led to a high acceptance level.

    Time:

    Title: Strategies and Responsibilities of Civil Society Organizations for Minimizing Food Wastage

    M Sudheendra
    University of Agriculture & Horticultural Sciences, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    M Sudheendra
    University of Agriculture & Horticultural Sciences, India

    Dr M Sudheendra, born in 1961, did his PhD at Dharwad Agricultural University in Agricultural Extension and he is a recognized Postgraduate teacher for 24 years. He has guided students leading to their Master’s degree, organized several training programs as a coordinator and nodal officer and published papers in the reputed journals besides presenting papers in the conferences. Presently Dr. Sudheendra is heading the Department of Agricultural Extension at University of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences, Shivamogga, Karnataka, India.



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    Abstract

    M Sudheendra
    University of Agriculture & Horticultural Sciences, India

    Majority social functions like weddings, social parties in canteens, hotels and family functions spew out considerable amount of food in India. As per several reports, up to 40 per cent of the food produced in India is bound to get wasted. About 21 million tonnes of India’s entire wheat produce are wasted and 50 per cent of all the food across the world meets the same fate. Such a situation raises a concern that food ‘never reaches the needy’. According to the Ministry of Agriculture, Rs 50,000 crore worth of food produced is wasted every year in India. Studying on food wastage is important to address issues relating to hunger, income and food security in developed countries. Food wastage adversely impacts on achieving food security, economic development and environment. Food wastage is also associated with wastage of all the resources used in food production, preparation, transportation, storage and distribution. It is paradoxical to note that poverty, hunger and malnutrition exist in many of the developed countries even after several years of their independence. Food wastage in social and cultural functions poses real threat to food security. Small quantities of poor quality food reaches the underprivileged families due to poor purchasing power and high cost of the food in the market. The quantum of food cooked but wasted in all types of social functions in India is massive. In this context food wastage minimization strategies was worked out for Shivamogga city in the state of Karnataka, India. Accordingly, programmes need to be organised for the benefit of public to minimize food wastage and its implications through mass media, awareness campaign and sign boards at public places to sensitize people about food management. Initiating food bank to collect leftover food and timely handing over to the needy poor people may be arranged by the civil society organisations.

    Time:

    Title: Chemo-pasting and Functional Characteristics of Sorghum-Lima Bean-Cocoyam Composite Flour

    Sunday A Malomo
    Federal University of Technology, Nigeria

    Biography
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    Biography

    Sunday A Malomo
    Federal University of Technology, Nigeria

    Sunday A Malomo is a Lecturer/ Researcher in the Department of Food Science and Technology of The Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria. He had his Ph.D In human nutrition in the areas of bioactive peptides and functional properties of food Proteins. His particular interest is in the use of bioactive peptides from plant/oil seed Proteins to formulate nutraceutical products serving as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in The treatment of pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. He is a recipient of several Scholarly awards, scholarships and fellowships from many local, national and International bodies; among which include University of Manitoba Graduate Fellowship (UMGF), Manitoba Graduate Scholarship (MGS), University of Manitoba International Graduate Student Scholarship (IGSS) and University of Manitoba International Graduate Student Entrance Scholarship (IGSES), all in Canada. He has authored and co-authored Several academic and research papers published in high-impact and peer-reviewed Journals.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Sunday A Malomo
    Federal University of Technology, Nigeria

    Composite flour was produced from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), lima bean (Phaseolus Lunatus) and cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagittifolium) flour blends at five different ratios viz: SLC1, SLC2, SLC3, SLC4 and SLC5. Each blend was evaluated for proximate, mineral Compositions, anti-nutritional factors, functional and pasting properties. The proximate results showed that the protein content for all flour blends ranged from 7.26-10.75%. SLC1 and SLC3 have significant (p<0.05) higher protein content than the control sample (wheat flour). Only these two flour blends met the FAO/WHO minimum recommended protein content of 10%. Meanwhile, all the flour blends could have maximum storage capacity and longer shelf live due to their low moisture content (10.13- 10.94%) when compare with that of the control (9.65%). The results further showed low levels of anti nutritional. Factors such as tannins, oxalate, hydrogen cyanide and phytates, hence enhancing the bioavailability of the nutrients from the flour blends after consumption. The sodium (45.1-52.4 g/100g) and calcium (88.4-103.5 g/100g) contents of the flour blends are significantly (p<0.05) higher than those of the control (2.4 and 40.8 g/100g). The Oil Absorption Capacity (OAC) increased significantly (p<0.05) from 8.025 to 9.387 with the highest OAC from sample SLC3 (9.387). The OAC of flour is important as it Improved the mouth feel and retains the flavour. It is concluded that the composite flour blends showed a greater promise in substituting wheat flour for baking purposes, to combat Protein Energy Malnutrition (PEM) in developing countries where PEM poses a health threat. Keywords: composite, pasting, sorghum, Lima, antinutrient

    Time:

    Title: Evaluation of Yeast and Lactic acid Bacteria Starters for the Production of Rice Injera

    Yassin Hassen Umar
    Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Yassin Hassen Umar
    Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Yassin Hassen Umar have completed My msc degree at the age of 30 years from Makerere University in Food Science and technology, Uganda. Yassin Hassen a lecturer and Researcher in the area of Nutrition, Food Science and technology. Yassin Hassen have published 2 papers and 5 ongoing manuscripts among that one is accepted.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Yassin Hassen Umar
    Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Injera is a yeast-risen flatbread with a unique, slightly spongy texture. It is a national staple in Ethiopia that is eaten daily in every household. Despite the fact that injera is a favorite staple food, starters have not been evaluated for the production of rice-based injera combinations of Lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus fermentum) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), LAB (L. plantarum and L. fermentum) and yeast (S. cerevisiae) and irsho (back slopping) were used as starters in the fermentation of rice injera batter during 96 h. Changes in pH, titratable acidity (TA) and microbial count were analyzed at 6 h intervals. The acceptability of rice injera baked after 24 and 48 h fermentation were determined using a consumer panel (n=30). LAB starters (L. plantarum and L. fermentum and their co-cultures S. cerevisiae decreased pH from 6.35 to 4.5 and increased TA from 0.33 to 0.95 % (lactic acid w/w) within 18 – 24 h while the spontaneous fermentation with traditional irsho took 48 -54 h to attain 0.38 pH value and 0.93 % TA. LAB and yeast counts in L. plantarum and its co-culture S. cerevisiae starter increased from 5.13 to 8.36 and 4.11 to 7.5 log cfu g-1 respectively within 24 h. LAB and yeast counts in L. fermentum and its co-culture S. cerevisiae increased from 5.09 to 8.45 log cfu g-1 and 4.11 to 7.43 log cfu g-1 .respectively. LAB and yeast count in L. plantarum and L. fermentum. LAB starter and their co-cultures S. cerevisiae grew from 5.25-8.42 log cfu g-1 and 4.14 to 7.40 log cfu g-1 respectively. In contrast LAB counts in naturally fermented rice injera batter increased from 5.08 log cfu g-1 to 8.30 log cfu g-1 after 48 h and yeast counts increased from 4.1 log cfu g-1 to 7.20 log cfu g-1 in 24 – 48 hrs. With regards to acceptability, rice injera prepared using the L.plantarum + S.cerevisiae starter scored the highest value 8.83 (like extremely) which is most acceptable while injera prepared with irsho (traditional starter) scored 7.40 (like moderately). Therefore, the L.planturum +S. cerevisiae starter combination can be can be used for commercial production of acceptable rice injera. Keywords: Rice injera; Lactobacillus plantarum; Lactobacillus fermentum; Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Sessions:
    Poster Presentations

    Time:

    Title: Cholesterol contents of restaurant and home meals in Korea

    Su-Jin Park
    Sunchon National University, Korea

    Biography
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    Biography

    Su-Jin Park
    Sunchon National University, Korea

    Sujin park completed her bachelor and master degree at the department of food science and technology. And she worked as a researcher at Gurye Wildflower Institute in Korea. At present she is working as a researcher in the department of food science and technology at Sunchon National University, Korea.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Su-Jin Park
    Sunchon National University, Korea

    Cholesterol is an essential component of cell membranes and a precursor of several bioactive compounds. However, high dietary cholesterol has been known to increase the risk of diseases such as obesity and hypertension. Recently, in Korea, eating-outpopulation has been increasing. In this study, the cholesterol contents of restaurant and home meals for 22 Korean key menu were analyzed and compared. First, Korea was geographically divided into six regions (capital city, east, west, southeast, southwest, and middle) and restaurant menu (10 rice dishes and 12 soup/stew) were collected nationwide (total 1584 =22 menu*12 restaurants/ region*6 regions). Next, home meals were prepared according to the national standard recipes for the 22 menu. Each sample was homogenized and analyzed for cholesterol by saponification, derivatization, and GC. The applied analytical method for cholesterol showed excellent accuracy (99.7% recovery) and precision (cvs: 1.22% repeatability and 1.93% reproducibility). The cholesterol content highly varied depending on menu and sampling regions. Home meal showed the cholesterol levels of 2.8~46.0 mg/100 g for rice dishes and 2.5~31.5 mg/100 g for soup/stew. The mean cholesterol contents of restaurant foods representing six regions ranged from 1.4 to 40.3 and 4.1 to 39.4 mg/100 g for rice dishes and soup/stew, respectively. The overall mean of cholesterol content was higher in home meal than restaurant food for rice dishes while it was lower in home meal than restaurant food for soup/stew. Results show that dietary cholesterol intake from 22 Korean key foods is much less than the daily reference intake of cholesterol (300 mg).

    Time:

    Title: Construction of Vitamin A Database for Korean Key Foods by MFDS’s National Analysis System

    Jiyeon Chun
    Sunchon National University, Korea

    Biography
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    Biography

    Jiyeon Chun
    Sunchon National University, Korea

    Jiyeon chun is presently working as a professor in the department of food science and technology at Sunchon National University, Korea. As well as she the Editor-in-chief at Editorial board of KOMYRA. Jiyeon Chun is also one of the Committee member in the Eco-friendly agriculture development board



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Jiyeon Chun
    Sunchon National University, Korea

    Vitamin A plays a role in immune function, vision, reproduction, growth and epithelial cell integrity. Recently, population in insufficient vitamin A intake is steadily increasing in Korea, which is partially due to a low-fat diet aimed to control weight. Inorder to profile national vitamin A data for restaurant and processed foods in Korean key foods, a comprehensive vitamin A analysis project began according to a statistical sampling and national analysis system designed by Ministry of Food and Drug Safety(MFDS). Restaurant foods were collected nationwide from six regions of Korea and processed foods were purchased from local markets (54 rice dishes, 98 stew, 20 kimchi, and 131 side dishes). Retinol and β-carotene were analyzed simultaneously by using saponification coupled with HPLC-UV (325 nm for retinol and 452 nm for β-carotene). Restaurant and processed foods showed large variations in retinol and β-carotene contents (mg/100 g): 0.0~925.4 and 0.0~168.7 for rice dishes, 0.0~1495.8 and 0.0~427.1 for stew, 0.0~6375.2 and 0.0~163.0 for side dishes, and 28.8~3138.4 and 0.0~18.0 for kimchi, respectively. Overall, β-carotene content was much higher than retinol, especially in side dishes and kimchi due to use of red pepper and sesame oil. Recovery more than 95% was obtained for simultaneous analysis of retinol and β-carotene, indicating good accuracy. All CV values of the applied method were less than 5%, showing good precision. Analytical quality control charts plotted for 7-years study showed that all assay were under the control. This study provides reliable retinol and β-carotene data for Korean key foods.

    Time:

    Title: Nitrite and Nitrate Content in Meat Products and Estimated Nitrite Intake among Children

    Andres Elias
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia

    Biography
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    Biography

    Andres Elias
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia

    Andres Elias Master`s degree in Dairy Technology in Estonian University of Life Sciences. Andres doctoral thesis is involved with chemical and biological hazards in food products. Heading of Andres thesis is – “Acrylamide and nitrite content in selected foods and dietary intake by Estonian children”.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Andres Elias
    Estonian University of Life Sciences, Estonia

    This study examined the intake of nitrite among Estonian children by consumption of processed meat products and drinking water. Daily intake estimations were based on the food consumption data from the Estonian National Dietary Survey. In addition, nitrite/nitrate concentrations of the meat and processed meat products were determined by laboratory analyses to estimate nitrite intake. The mean intake of nitrite among 1087 studied children was 0.015 and 0.016 mg kg-1 body weight day-1, respectively among children in age 12–35 months and 3–10 years. Acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 0.07 mg nitrite kg-1 body weight day-1 was exceeded among 34 children (3.1%). The prevalence was higher in the youngest age group (4.1% of boys and 4.7% of) than in the oldest age group (3.8% of boys and 1.7% of girls). Nevertheless, statistical analysis did not show significant differences among different age groups and genders, respectively p=0,157 and p=0,179 in logistic regression. Considering the consumption of processed meat and drinking water the mean nitrite intake in the age groups of 12–35 months and 3–10 years were respectively 21.9% and 22.9% from ADI value. Presuming that the food consumption data is representative, we can state that among the total population of the age group 12 months to 10 years the exceeding of the ADI value was 3.13% (95% CI; 2.18–4.34).

    Time:

    Title: Innovative Foods Based on Plums Enriched with Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Barbu Vasilica
    Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Romania

    Biography
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    Biography

    Barbu Vasilica
    Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Romania

    Barbu vasilica graduated in 1991 the Faculty of Biology in the University of Bucharest. Since 2003 she is holder in Faculty of Food Science and Engineering (Dunarea de Jos University of Galati) for disciplines: cellular biology, genetic engineering, biotechnology of cell and tissues cultures, environmental monitoring and phytosanitary control. Associate Professor since 2009.5 books as author/coauthor, 36 papers published in ISI or DBI journals, over 29 studies published full or summary in the proceedings of international scientific events,12 research and innovation projects. Silver Medal at the International Exhibition of Inventions in Geneva, in 2014 for Patent Number RO126627-A0.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Barbu Vasilica
    Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Romania

    Plums, through their rich content in phenolic compounds (anthocyanins, flavonols and resveratrol) and fibers, are a natural source of biocompounds with antioxidant properties that have many applications in the pharmaceutical or food industry, medicine and cosmetics. The fruits of Prunus domestica ssp. insititia (Damson cultivar) were purchased from the local market, washed and cut into small cubes. The vegetal matrix was used in a fresh, dry form or as lyophilized powder. A 1012 CFU/g inoculum of an overnight Lactobacillus brevis 16GAL was scattered across the vegetal tissue. For all the obtained products the viability of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was evaluated by cultural methods over a period of 30 days. Total phenolic content of the plum extracts was determined using the Folin–Ciocalteu colorimetric. The antioxidant activity was assessed based on the DPPH method. The polyphenols yield varied between 18.93 ± 2.3 mg GAE/100 g DW. The DPPH free radical scavenging activity of 91.53% was correlated to the phenolic compounds content and the lactic acid bacteria viability in regards to the proposed assortments. After 30 days of refrigeration, the total number of Lb. Brevis was 109 CFU/g in fresh plums, 107 CFU/g in both dried plums and in the powder supplement. The comparative confocal analysis of the samples was performed in order to capture the structural, textural and compositional changes of the experimental variants. Functional food supplements as ready-to-eat single dosage, based on plums enriched with lactic acid bacteria were designed, for optimal nutrition and health well-being or that could correct some digestive diseases.

    Time:

    Title: Osmotic Dehydration Kinetics and Effects on Desorption Isotherms, Color, Shrinkage and other Properties of White-Flesh and Biofortified Yellow-Flesh Cassava during Dehydration

    Oluwatoyin Ayetigbo
    Universität Hohenheim, Germany

    Biography
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    Biography

    Oluwatoyin Ayetigbo
    Universität Hohenheim, Germany

    Oluwatoyin Ayetigbo is working as a junior researcher in the Universität Hohenheim, Germany. His main specialization in the Agricultural engineering and basically his researches and publications are on the Agricultural Engineering in the tropics and sub tropics.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Oluwatoyin Ayetigbo
    Universität Hohenheim, Germany

    Dehydration of dices of white-flesh and yellow-flesh cassava varieties from high tO intermediate water activity was conducted using osmotic solutions of salt, sugar, and salt-sugar at different temperatures (30-60°C), and concentrations (10-70°Brix) Kinetics of water loss (WL) and solids gain (SG) was observed by fitting data to four osmotic dehydration (OD) models (Page, Weibull, Azuara, and Peleg). The best conditions selected for OD, judged by highest WL and WL/SG ratio, was obtained by using 70 °Brix salt-sugar solution at 45°C, where estimated WL was 0.5220 g/g and 0.7197 g/g, estimated SG was 0.2934g/g and 0.2778g/g, and WL/SG ratio was 1.779 and 2.591, for white-flesh and yellow-flesh cassava, respectively. Estimated WL, SG, and WL/SG ratio increased with concentration of salt-sugar solution, but varied with temperature. Multiple linear regression equations of high R2 (0.6368-0.9988) and adjusted R2 (0.5642-0.9979), and low MAPE (0.67-11.49%) were derived to estimate WL and SG. Over 300-minute OD process at selected conditions, water activity (aw) at 23°C, 34°C and 45°C reduced from 0.94 to 0.75, 0.98 to 0.78, and 0.99 to 0.78, respectively, for white-flesh cassava; whereas aw reduced from 0.96 to 0.74, 0.98 to 0.76 and 0.99 to 0.78, respectively, for yellow-flesh cassava. Sorption isotherm models were also used to fit moisture sorption data and to explain aw- moisture content relationships during OD. Net isosteric heat of desorption data were calculated. The surface colour lightness, L*, and whiteness, W, reduced significantly, while yellowness, b*, increased significantly for white cassava at selected OD conditions.Preliminary results also revealed OD and subsequent drying significantly reduced total cyanogenic glucosides (assayed as total HCN equivalents). Shrinkage of yellow-flesh cassava was more than for white-flesh cassava, as also observed from scanning electron images. Osmotic dehydration may be useful for reducing water activity of cassava prior to drying. Keywords: Cassava dice, Diffusivity, Moisture ratio, Osmotic dehydration, Water activity

    Time:

    Title: Storage Studies of blend of Soymilk Skim cow milk-yoghurt During Refrigerated Storage

    Hilal Ahmad Punoo
    University of Kashmir Hazratbal, India

    Biography
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    Biography

    Hilal Ahmad Punoo
    University of Kashmir Hazratbal, India

    Dr. Hilal Ahmad Punoo is born in 1978 at grandmother’s house at District Pulwama which is known as Milk town of Jammu and Kashmir. He did his B. Sc Agriculture at Narain College Shikohabad, U.P. in 2000. He did his M. Sc Dairy Science from Raja Balwant Singh College Agra, U. P. in 2003. He did his Ph.D in Dairy Technology from National Dairy Research Institute Karnal-INDIA in 2009. He has been appointed as Assistant Professor at University of Kashmir Srinagar-J&K in 2010 at Food Technology Department. He is involved in teaching and research work. His research area includes dairy foods, functional dairy foods etc.



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Hilal Ahmad Punoo
    University of Kashmir Hazratbal, India

    The utilization of soybean milk with skim cow milk in manufacturing yoghurt and quality evaluation during storage was investigated. Two samples of soy-yoghurt namely sample a (100% soymilk) and sample b (1:1 soymilk: skim cow milk) were prepared and were stored at refrigeration temperature (7±2°C) followed by analysis for physico-chemical properties for 20 days at 5 days interval. The type of milk significantly (p≤0.05) affected the ph-values of the soy-yogurt. Sample a showed higher values of ph than sample b throughout the storage period. Storage period significantly (p≤0.05) affected the ph-values of soy-yogurt samples. The highest ph-value for sample a (4.70) was obtained at the beginning of the storage period, whereas the lowest (4.20) at the end. Similarly the highest ph-value for sample b (4.30) was obtained at the beginning of the storage period, whereas the lowest (3.10) was obtained at the end. The type of milk significantly (p≤0.05) affected titratable acidity of soy-yogurt samples. Sample b was recorded as having the higher values of acidity than sample through out the storage period. Storage period significantly (p≤0.05) affected titratable acidity of soy-yogurt samples. Sample a showed higher values of wheying off (ml) than sample b throughout the storage period. Storage period significantly (p≤0.05) affected wheying off of soy-yogurt samples. The highest value of wheying off for sample a (3.10 ml) was obtained at the end of the storage period, whereas the lowest (0.50 ml) at the beginning. Similar observations for wheying off were reported for sample Keywords: soy yoghurt, skim cow milk, storage, analysis, ph, acidity, wheying off

    Time:

    Title: Total Phenol and Antioxidant Potentials of Extracts from Yellow Cassava Peels and Stem

    Esther Ekeledo
    University of Hohenheim, Germany

    Biography
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    Biography

    Esther Ekeledo
    University of Hohenheim, Germany



    Abstract
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    Abstract

    Esther Ekeledo
    University of Hohenheim, Germany

    Phytochemicals like phenols, carotenoids, tocopherols present in plants are strong antioxidants that play vital roles in the health care system.The economic value of cassava can be enhanced by incorporating the utilization of all the different parts through a complete reduction, recycling and reuse of the by-products. The focus of this study was to investigate the content of total phenols and the antioxidant activity of the yellow cassava peels and stems; and the effect of different particle size using different antioxidant assays. The peels and stems of the yellow cassava variety were collected and total phenolic and antioxidant activities were determined in their methanolic extracts. Average total phenolic yield from the extracts were 584.52 Gallic acid equivalent (GAE) mg /100 g (peel) and 272.47 GAE mg/100 g (stem) and 1, 1-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity ranged from 8.08 - 18.93% and 9.43 – 20.77% (Peel; 6hr and 24hr) and -0.20 – 11.35% and 2.34 – 11.34% (Stem, 6hr and 24hr) respectively. The peel and stem extracts measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power assay had a significant effect (p<0.01) on the antioxidant activities ranging from 102.00 – 169.50 μm TE/g for the peel and 73 – 107.50 μm TE/g for the stem. The findings in this study suggested that the peel and stem particle sizes influenced the extraction of antioxidants; and the samples particle sizes were dependent on the solvent concentration, the incubation time and the different antioxidant assays used. Yellow cassava peels exhibited high antioxidant scavenging activities due to the high phenolic content and the particle size, dilutions and incubation time also had significant impact on the TPC and antioxidant activity and can be considered good source of natural antioxidants. Keywords: Ferric reducing antioxidant power, Gallic acid equivalent, Antioxidant activity, Yellow cassava, Radical scavenging activity, Total phenolic content.

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